Horse and wildlife art by Mona Majorowicz.

Wild Faces Gallery Wild Faces Gallery & Frame

Horse Art

Gallery


Caballero

Andalusian Horse

I photographed this handsome Andalusian stallion at the MN Horse Expo many many years ago when the horse was first quite young and a much darker gray. Since I attend this horse expo very nearly every year either as an artist selling my equine artwork or merely as a spectator collecting reference photos so I've been able to watch this stallion mature and become more beautiful, and more masterful at his Spanish movements with each passing year.

What really drew me to wanting to paint this horse in this way was the compositional cropping and color elements. This piece is several years old at this point and is yet still one of my favorite horse paintings.

This is yet another horse that I have hundreds of photos of and I'm sure I'll be committing him to art again soon.

The original painting was watercolor pencil done on Arches #140 Hot Press Watercolor Paper.

PLEASE NOTE: The watermark is for online viewing only and does NOT appear on the artwork.

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Catch

Bay Horse

As an equestrian artist I am often asked if I do horse portraits and truthfully I do them rarely. I do 1 or 2 horse portraits a year but they have to fall under specific criteria. The main one being that I get copious amounts of photos to work from. This is most easily accomplished by my being able to photograph the horse myself. The other benefit to this is that it gives me a chance to really get a feel for the horse and his personality and that I think helps for a more effective portrayal when I create the actual painting.

This is an excerpt from my Apples 'N Oats magazine column regarding the creation of the Catch painting. It tells the story of trying to get that perfect reference photo for a portrait.

As they had just been turned out, Catch really took very little interest in meeting us. This actually makes the photographing part easier. However, he was so engrossed in eating, that after a few shots of him grazing, well . . . we needed a little more excitement!

So Carol flung bits of grass in the air and was rewarded with a lazy flick of the ear. She did the usual clapping, whistling and flailing of arms. He watched her quizzically, occasionally lifting his head (with large mouthfuls of grass mind you) to get a better look. But after a few brief moments, he promptly resumed grazing.

At this point, we fell to bribery. I had some apples in the van and we tried to lure him into some interesting facial expressions, which hopefully didn't involve chewing or swallowing. I managed to get a few more pictures taken, until of course the apple was gone.

So Carol, in an earnest desire to help me get some action shots, started jogging around the pasture, occasionally springing into the air, while making excited chirpy noises, accompanied with yet more flailing of arms. The jogging thing got the ol’ boy’s interest, perhaps out of curiosity more than anything, but he trotted along beside her.

The original horse painting was done in watercolor pencil on Arches 140# Hot Press Watercolor Paper.

Please Note: The watermark that appears on this image is for online viewing onluy and does NOT appear on the actual artwork.

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Colton

White Arabian Horse

Help Suppport IERAL

Early in 2008 the Iowa Equine Rescue & Awareness League (IERAL) asked me to create a portrait as part of a fund raiser. IERAL is an established non-profit organization which provides care and rehabilitation for the animals they take in.

This image is of Colton, a lovely little 7 year old, gray Arabian gelding, who's likable demeanor immediately entranced me. His gentle, sweet nature and good manners reminded me much of my own horse.

Colton is blind, probably from a virus that went untreated. The good new is, it is reversible with surgery and the organization is working to raise funds to help with the procedure. So, that coupled with his beauty in both looks and spirit, made him the ideal poster child (urm . . . horse) for an IREAL fund raiser.

50% of the print proceeds go to IERAL

to help Colton and other horses in need. For more information on IERAL, please visit the IERAL website.

PLEASE NOTE: The watermark is for online viewing only and does NOT appear on the artwork.

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Guardian Spirits

American Wild Horses

"Guardian Spirits" is a painting based on a visit to the Black Hills Wild Horse Sanctuary in Hot Springs, South Dakota. These people work hard to maintain a privately funded reserve for some of the unwanted wild horses that had been culled to reduce wild horse populations. The horses were destined to spend their remaining days in feedlots until these people stepped up and offered to provide a place they could run free again.

There is a cliff wall covered in Anasazi petroglyphs located at the Black Hills Wild Horse Sanctuary. As I stood and gazed at the carvings on this cliff, it was like touching the past. At that instant, I knew the combination of the wild horses and the ancient petroglyphs would be a wonderful painting.

Please Note: The Wild Faces Gallery watermark is for online viewing only and does NOT appear on this artwork.

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Kindred Spirits

Horse Herd

This is an excerpt from my Apples 'N Oats magazine article regarding the creation of the Kindred Spirits painting.

I am attracted to repeating patterns. The curves of the necks and the backs, as well as the monochromatic coloring of having all bays and grays, intrigues me. The models were once again my neighbor's herd. It was made up of about a dozen broodmares with foals and yearlings.

When I started this painting, I again toyed with the idea of horses as landscapes. I envisioned their arching necks and gently sloping backs as rolling hills. Initially, my plan was to have negative space or a background along the top third of the painting. It would provide the skyline, so to speak. However, the problem with this was that it made the horses look rather squatty. It didn't work at all. So on to plan B. Fill it with horses. From my experience, This is always a no-fail plan.

The original horse painting was done in oil pastel on museum board.

AND... I'm now on Zazzle so you can get some of your favorite art on various items that range anywhere from art tiles, to sketch diaries to coffee mugs and mousepads. Kindred Spirits is now available on a coffee mug. The image wraps around the mug for a fun and whimsical way to start your day. http://www.zazzle.com/wildfacesgallery*

PLEASE NOTE: The watermark is for online viewing only and does NOT appear on the artwork.

Click here for pricing.


Liberty

Friesian Stallion

Tall, Dark and Seriously Handsome

Frieisans are one of my favorite breeds. Yeah, I know I’m totally alone in this.

Any one who likes horses . . . even a little, likes Friesians. Anyone who is a romantic. . . even a little, likes Friesians. But they really do have all the attributes I admire in horses. They have size. In general they have great temperaments. They’re black. (Ever since I read Walter Farley’s The Black Stallion that has been the color of choice for me.) They have unbelievable hair. Seriously what’s not to love?

I paint horse quite a bit and frankly most of the time I love a good fat backyard pony as much (sometimes more) than the most glorious show horse.But Friesians really grab me from a spiritual place and they tend to get my artistic juju flowing.

This is beautiful young Friesian stallion was photographed at a breeding farm a year or so back. The farm owners allowed me free range to come and go from the paddocks and pastures at my leisure.Even still I stayed outside the young stallion pen but nonetheless this one came over to check me out.

He snuffled about sure I must be smuggling some sort of treat or why else would I be there. Upon discovering that I didn't come bearing gifts as surely was proper etiquette, he then decided I was completely unremarkable and left. So this horse painting is the result. Him leaving me ... but with flair.

The original horse painting was watercolor pencil and water soluble ink on suede board.

Please Note: The watermark that appears on this image is for online viewing onluy and does NOT appear on the actual artwork.

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Natural Grace

Friesian Horse

I have a passion for heavy horses and the Friesian is at the top of my list. The model for this painting was based on a horse from the Minnesota Horse Expo.

This lovely horse was standing outside in the staging area being attended to by several people. They were brushing out the mane and tail, bringing his coat up to a high shine and polishing his hooves. And as for the question so many people ask, yes his hair was really that long. In fact it spread out on the ground as well.

As to what drew me to create this horse painting was the fact that I was particularly attracted to the rolling curves and ample mane and tail.I also like the almost deco feel to the piece.

In truth this horse painting was me just sort of playing around with oil pastels which for me at the time was a new medium.I never really expected it to be anything more than a study but when I finished it I kinda liked it. My husband on the other hand really liked the painting and convinced me to add it to the horse art prints that I offer. I have to say he was right. It's been the most popular horse art print ever since.

The original horse painting was done in oil pastel on museum board.

PLEASE NOTE: The watermark is for online viewing only and does NOT appear on the artwork.

Click here for pricing.


Red Carnations

White Horse

This painting was part of a grouping of horse paintings done for an exhibition. The series consisted of the role of horses and their fundamental importance to our progress as a nation. This last piece in the series shows the present and I believe future of the horse as more of a luxury item. His immaculate grooming as well as his tack tells that he is a horse whose sole purpose is the art of horsemanship. That being said, this painting also represents the pure beauty of the horse and its willingness to perform any role we lay before it.

The original horse painting of this white stallion was done in watercolor pencil on arches paper.

Please Note: The watermark that appears on this image is for online viewing only and does NOT appear on the actual artwork.

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Soul

Close Up Of Horse Face

This is portrait of my horse "Chicory." He has a sweet disposition and a kind eye. I don't have as much time to spend with him as I would like, but I always give him some hugs and kisses daily, and take some time to scratch his "Itchies." He generally has such a soft look on his face. This gentle expression is what I tried to capture here.

Truthfully I think there is a little bit of Chicory in nearly every horse I paint. He is my confidant, my friend and perhaps most importantly my artistic muse.He enables me to bring my love and spiritual attachment to horses to nearly all my equestrian paintings. And while I was p[ainting horses long before I ever owned him, I don't think i considered my an equestrian artist until after he came into my life. I owe him a great deal I think.

The original horse painting was done in watercolor pencil and water soluble ink on suede board.

Please Note: The watermark that appears on this image is for online viewing only and does NOT appear on the actual artwork.

Click here for pricing.


Spanish Gold

Andalusian Stallion In Spanish Tack

The original painting of this horse was done in watercolor pencil on suede board. I photographed this handsome fella at the Kentucky Horse Park a few years back when I was attending an event and was sharing an art booth with an equestrian sculptor friend. This stunning Andalusian horse was the main event for the weekend, showing off all his fancy Spanish and dressage moves.

I was totally enamored with him from the first moment I set eyes on him and I knew I would be painting him at least once.You might say I sorta became a stalker. I'd hang out beside the barns waiting for him to do his warm ups for the show. I'd photograph him going to the show, waiting for his turn outside and then returning to the barn. It wasn't until the very last day that I actually stayed indoors to watch him perform.And yes, he was spectacular.In the end I had well over 400 photos of him and truthfully I don't think there was an ugly shot of him in the bunch.

He is an equestrian artists dream horse.Obviously he's a beautiful stallion and at all times was he tacked up in the most spectacular gear. His mane and tail quite were thick and billowing and quite literally touched the ground. Yup total horse artist eye candy.

Though this is the first horse painting I've done of him I doubt it will be the last.

Please Note: The watermark that appears on this image is for online viewing only and does NOT appear on the actual artwork.

Click here for pricing.


The Better Half

Quarter Horse

I went to a cattle branding on a ranch in Wyoming during the summer of 1999 with an equestrian artist friend and I was captivated by this horse and rider and how they worked together so perfectly. They had formed a definite partnership working almost like they were one creature. It brought to mind the partnership between a husband and wife, how they compliment one another and often introduce their partner as their "Better Half."

The original horse painting was watercolor pencil on Winsor Newton #110 Hot Press watercolor paper.

Please Note: The watermark that appears on this image is for online viewing only and does NOT appear on the actual artwork.

Click here for pricing.


Thoroughbred Stallion

Bay Thoroughbred Stallion

This horse painting was done as a portrait of a stunning racing thoroughbred stallion named Kirkendahl. He is a tall, dark and handsome fella with a fondness for beer and peppermints.

Artistically speaking, I loved putting all the rich and vibrant colors of his coat in as well as the sheen. It is always a joy to paint portraits of truly beautiful animals.

The original horse portrait was done in watercolor pencil on suede board.

PLEASE NOTE: The watermark is for online viewing only and does NOT appear on the artwork.

Click here for pricing.


Tuckered Out

Resting Foal

This was the first painting I did using suede board for my substrate and I fell in love. It has certain limitations to the abuse I usually deal out, (I tend to layer in color until my paper screams for mercy) but the suede offers a visual softness that I struggle to create on watercolor papers.

I've had the photo of this foal laying in my to do pile for nearly a decade. It wasn't until I decided to try suede that I actually used it. Sometimes it takes just the right combination of medium and substrate to make me say, "Hey, I think I'll do this one today.” And apparently suede matboard was just such a trigger.

This horse painting was done using watercolor pencils and was a nice stretch of my comfort zones. I rarely do baby animal art anyway but this little guy was just so darned cute I knew he had to be painted at some point.

AND... I'm now on Zazzle so you can get some of your favorite art on various items that range anywhere from art tiles, to sketch diaries to coffee mugs and mousepads. This little foal is now available on mousepads and soon several other items. http://www.zazzle.com/wildfacesgallery*

Please Note: The watermark that appears on this image is for online viewing only and does NOT appear on the actual artwork.

Click here for pricing.


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Text and original graphics copyright © Mona Majorowicz, 2000-2017.
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